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December 22, 2018

Friday, Dec. 14, was CLUES’ annual Al Niño con Cariño event! Hundreds of kids and families enjoyed crafts, treats and holiday cheer as parents were able to select gifts for the holidays. In addition, CLUES provided snacks and gifts for the Coalición de Boricuas en Minnesota’s Celebración del Día de los Reyes event. Altogether, more than 700 children and their families will receive holiday gifts this year.

A special thanks to the following groups for their time, donations and support: Target, US Bank, Prudential, Ecolab, Cargill, Jacobs Marketing, General Mills, Land O’ Lakes, Risen Christ School, St. Elizabeth Orthodox Church, Toys for Tots, U Care, Children’s Theater, William Mitchell College for Law and United Way.

Posted in CLUES Blog by Austin Wiebe
December 14, 2018

Throughout the week, we’re highlighting recent graduates from CLUES’ YA! Program. Since 2011, the program has guided more than 120 high school students to achieve their hopes and dreams through one-on-one mentoring, coaching institutes, academic support and community service-learning projects. Please consider supporting the YA! Program with a year-end financial gift! Thanks to a generous donation from the Land O’ Lakes Amigos group, all donations will be matched up to $5,000. Learn more here.

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Leslie’s Story

Leslie is a first-generation Mexican American student who graduated from Park High School in the Spring of 2018. She now attends the University of St. Thomas—the first in her family to attend college—with a major in Social Work.

How did the YA! Program and your mentor prepare you for your life after high school?

I think the program does a good job of showing you the different routes that are available, like two-year and four-year schools. The main purpose is to help you go to college and advance in your education, but it doesn’t push you to do that if you you don’t want to. For me it helped with my applications, FASFA and financial aid.

One of our institutes was life skills, which was really nice. There were 20 different stations about different life skills such as nutrition and healthy relationships. It was stuff that you don’t really know but was good to learn. It’s not just school and education related, but also about your personal life and how to do things.

Are there specific activities/lessons/opportunities YA! provides that especially impacted you?

At every institute there is something different and something new. Overall there are a lot of opportunities that are offered to you. About two years ago, I got to be part of a panel group at the Women’s Foundation of Minnesota. That was the first time I was exposed to networking, putting yourself out there and telling your story. After that, a lot of opportunities have come for me to speak to people.

One of my favorite things I got to do was the women’s retreat, because the other ladies and I got to put it together and make it our own. It was one of my favorite things because it was about how to build confidence in ourselves. And it was a really nice time to get to know people – I really got to know more girls better.

What have you learned about yourself throughout your journey with the YA! Program?

We did a survey and test that pointed out your different personalities – things that you might already know but are revealed more. Then I talked to my mentor about the different things that it highlighted. One of them about was not asking for help. I learned that I don’t always like asking for help. And that is something I need to work on, because you have to let others help you and speak up when you need something.

Why do you think programs like YA! are important?

I think it is really important because it is for the Latino community, and there aren’t a lot like it. I think there are a lot of students who need support to get into college, finish high school or things like that. I think it is really important to have a community group to help you through it.

I like YA! because it involves you in so many aspects with the community. It’s not just preparing students for college or after high school. It’s also involving you with your community, doing service projects and building a consciousness about civic engagement. It also gets you to think about more things, and I really like that. It’s a gateway to a lot of opportunities.

YA! does a good job of involving not only the student but the parents as well. There are meetings with parents once in a while, because the parents also don’t know how to navigate the system. I feel like that is something that happens to a lot of people – the students and the parents don’t know how things work or don’t get the help they need at school.

What message or advice do you have for younger Latino students?

There are a lot of things that will put you down, and there are a lot of things that are going to make you want to make excuses for yourself. But don’t make excuses for yourself because of your situation or because of things going on. As hard as it can be, you have to push through it. Just do things and push through them, even when you can’t always envision yourself doing them.

What does it mean to you and your family to graduate?

I’m a first generation student so it’s kind of emotional. All their hard work and all your hard work… you’re finally seeing the outcome of it. I don’t know how to explain it. It’s just very exciting.

What’s next for you?

I’m attending the University of St. Thomas. And from there on my goals are to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree and get a job. I think I want to go into social work.

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If you would like to support students like Leslie in achieving their hopes and dreams, consider becoming YA! Program mentor or making a donation to the YA! Program. Thanks to a generous donation from the Land O’ Lakes Amigos group, all donations will be matched up to $5,000! Learn more here.

Posted in CLUES Blog by Austin Wiebe
December 12, 2018

Throughout the week, we’re highlighting recent graduates from CLUES’ YA! Program. Since 2011, the program has guided more than 120 high school students to achieve their hopes and dreams through one-on-one mentoring, coaching institutes, academic support and community service-learning projects. Please consider supporting the YA! Program with a year-end financial gift! Thanks to a generous donation from the Land O’ Lakes Amigos group, all donations will be matched up to $5,000. Learn more here.

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Jenni’s Story

Jenni is a first-generation Mexican American student. She graduated from Washington Tech High School in the Spring of 2018, and now attends Carleton College.

How did the YA! Program and your mentor prepare you for your life after high school?

I’ve stayed with my mentor for three years. It’s been really cool. She’s really encouraging and she’ll push me to do things. We like a lot of the same things. We are both introverted and like to read, and our college selections were pretty close.

In the beginning when I joined, I was awkward and shy. I knew I wanted to do a lot of stuff, but I didn’t know how to do it or if I could do it. So a lot of times my mentor would say “Well, why aren’t you doing it? You’ve got to go do it.” And she gave me that extra push that would say “Okay you did this, which means that now you can do this, and now you can do this, and this.” Until eventually I got to the point where I didn’t need her to tell me to do it. I would think, “Nicole thinks I’m capable, so I think I am capable.”

Are there specific activities/lessons/opportunities YA! provides that especially impacted you?

There was one workshop that focused on life things that they don’t teach you in school. We learned about things like how to do laundry, healthy relationships and how to take care of yourself in terms of mental and physical health. They don’t really teach you that anywhere else, so I thought it was cool.

Can you share your favorite memory of YA?

There are a lot of good times. During the summer of last year, we had a girls’ retreat. We were put in groups and I had my own little group with 5-6 other girls and Ms. Tanya. We all talked about life. I looked at these girls and thought “They look different from me, we are all Mexican, we are all Hispanic looking, but I’m a little weird so I’ll stay at the sidelines.” But it was the first time we all had a good time together, we laughed together and we cried together. It was pretty cool.

What have you learned about yourself throughout your journey with the YA! Program?

I’m quiet, I’m introverted, I don’t like talking in front of people. I want to speak up and I want to get ideas out there, but it’s not always easy when you’re so used to thinking “Someone else is going to say it, so I won’t say anything.” But YA! teaches you that no one is going to say it unless you do – or no one will say it the way that you say it. So if you have an idea or if you have some kind of input in the discussion, the only one who will get your voice heard is you. It was a really important lesson and even helped me with stuff like college interviews for scholarships.

Why do you think programs like YA! are important?

When people talk about people of color, they don’t always focus on Latinos – a lot of times we are overlooked. We need a space for us to really connect with each other. A lot of us go to schools where it’s predominately not Latino, but here we can all tell our stories and we all have a similar background. I feel like a lot of us get a push out of that, and when we see one of us succeed, we all want to succeed too.

When I first joined, I was always watching the older Latina girls. When they succeeded and said “I’m going to this school” or “I got this scholarship,” I thought, “I want to be just like you.” A lot of us don’t learn the things YA! teaches us from school. Students plan out the meetings and we learn things about the world that connect to Latinos – and we all listen more because we are hearing it from Latinos. I think programs like YA! empower us and encourage us to be better than we are now.

What message or advice do you have for younger Latino students?

Some of us think that we have a limit to how “smart” we can be. We think, “I’m not that smart, I can’t do that.” But that’s not true. Some of us look toward stereotypes that people pin on us and think “I can only go up to this because I’m a Latino or I’m a Latina.” But no. If you want to be a top student, if you want to go to a super selective college, then do it! Go for it. The only time it’s completely off the board is when you tell yourself that you’re giving up. But if you say, “Hey, I’m going to do this because I CAN do it,” then you can find an inner push that keeps you going. It’s not because you’re smarter than others, it’s because you work hard. In the end, you turn out stronger than when you first began. It’ll be hard and sometimes you’ll doubt yourself, but you’ll always find a support group that can see the power in you that you want to feel in yourself.

What does it mean to you and your family to graduate?

A lot of our parents weren’t born here and had to go through a lot to get here. They always tell us “We got here so YOU could have a better future.” So me succeeding is a way for me to tell them “You worked hard for a reason. You did good by going through all those struggles.” Or “Your struggles aren’t in vain, because I’m going to do really well. And I’m going to go to the top. I appreciate what you did for me.”

My dad is the smartest man in the world. Others might see him and think “Oh, he’s a factory worker.” But for me, he’s the wisest, smartest man in the world. He never got to go to college. He wanted to, but he didn’t have the money. So for me, it’s like I’m living out my dream so he can see his dream in me. It makes me really happy – even though he didn’t go to college, it’s like I’m saying “I’ve got you, Dad. I’m going to make it, so don’t worry about me.”

What’s next for you?

I’m attending Carleton College. After that, I don’t know. I like psychology, I like political science, I like literature, I like reading and writing. I’m looking forward to working hard.

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If you would like to support students like Jenni in achieving their hopes and dreams, consider becoming YA! Program mentor or making a donation to the YA! Program. Thanks to a generous donation from the Land O’ Lakes Amigos group, all donations will be matched up to $5,000! Learn more here.

Posted in CLUES Blog by Austin Wiebe
December 10, 2018

Throughout the week, we’re highlighting recent graduates from CLUES’ YA! Program. Since 2011, the program has guided more than 120 high school students to achieve their hopes and dreams through one-on-one mentoring, coaching institutes, academic support and community service-learning projects. Please consider supporting the YA! Program with a year-end financial gift! Thanks to a generous donation from the Land O’ Lakes Amigos group, all donations will be matched up to $5,000. Learn more here.

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Karla’s Story

Karla is a first-generation Salvadoran-American student. She graduated from Tartan High School in the Spring of 2018, and now attends Augsburg University. We asked Karla about her experience with the YA! Program.

How did the YA! Program and your mentor prepare you for your life after high school?

The program gave me a mentor, someone I didn’t know, and gave an opportunity to share my story with that person. My mentor Jenny has been there for me in the bad and good. When I share about my life, she never judges me and she gives me advice in certain situations. She encourages me to do better and believes in me when I don’t believe in myself. We can share our views and share what we are going through. Jenni has made a big impact in my life. She’s been there as a friend as a mentor as a sister. She always asks me how I’m doing. She’s a very important person in my life until we die I guess! That’s the kind of relationship we have built up and created.

Are there specific activities, lessons or opportunities YA! provides that especially impacted you?

Even though I have done it many times, volunteering at Feed My Starving Children. YA! organized it and we went there with my mentor. Just listening to how many kids are starving for food… Those activities that YA! has provided for students to learn about the community, to support the community, learn to help and learn from the community.

I think civic engagement is a big one. As an individual I’m not big into politics. It’s not that I don’t care, it’s just not my interest. I think YA! has helped me to change or build up an interest to learn about what is going on in the community. Learn about what will help or not help Latinos in the United States, or students.

With all the activities that I have done, YA! has really helped me with getting myself out of my comfort zone. Usually I’m not shy, usually I’m outgoing – but coming to the US not really knowing the language here, I built a bubble and I was not okay with leaving the bubble. I have seen myself growing and being outgoing again and speaking and talking to people. YA! has helped me with that tremendously. Freshman year I was sitting in the corner not talking. But now I’m the person going to people asking “Hey, how are you doing? How’ve you been?” I’m more confident and outgoing talking to people and meeting new people.

What have you learned about yourself throughout your journey with the YA! Program?

I’ve learned to be more open to people. Every time we go to YA! and talk about school and scholarships, I get motivated to do better and to go into the week and do the homework. I think that something that YA! has taught me is that even though at first something can seem really hard or difficult, at the end of the tunnel there’s a light. For me as a Hispanic, as an El Salvadorian, and looking back at my freshman year compared to now, I think I have grown a lot.

What is a moment or accomplishment that you are especially proud of?

Getting into college, getting those acceptance letters. I thought it was going to be very difficult for me to get into school or schools would reject me. Only one rejected me. I think that it was a huge win for me. I was admitted into Augsburg University where I am attending. They sent me an email saying that I qualified for a promise grant/scholarship program that helps four-year students. I applied in the beginning of the year and after lots of waiting, I got the email saying “Congratulations, you are one of the 25 that we have chosen.” I never thought this would happen to me. I thought I would have to pay loans. But getting into a program that will help me with my four years… Wow. I never thought I would get in.

Why do you think programs like YA! are important?

I think YA! is important because they help the students to be successful in life. They provide you with skills, and if you stay with the program for the four years, you will see that you have grown throughout those years. I think that is really important. And in life, meeting new people and learning from others are important. Programs like YA! help students grow a lot, learn a lot, and they get more motivated for their future.

What message or advice do you have for younger Latino students?

Situations are difficult right now; it’s hard to think that you have a future in this country. But don’t let that stop you. There are always opportunities. There are always doors opening, even if you think that the door is never going to open. Stick to your dreams and stick to what you want in 10 years, in 15 years, and how you want to help your family. Focus on being successful and learning about yourself. Loving yourself too and respecting yourself. If you don’t respect yourself, others won’t respect you. Life is hard but there’s always light at the end of the tunnel.

What does it mean to you and your family to graduate?

To me it’s a huge deal even though it is high school. For Latinos in this country, there are dropouts, and graduating for me means that I am not one of those dropouts. For me, graduation means the end of one chapter and starting another.  And starting a new chapter stronger with good perspectives. Even though bad situations will come, there is always a way, and there are always answers, and you will overcome challenges.

What’s next for you?

I’m attending Augsburg University, majoring in Psychology and Spanish. I want to be a Spanish teacher. I think that is next for me. I want to be involved in my community and college community.

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If you would like to support students like Karla in achieving their hopes and dreams, consider becoming YA! Program mentor or making a donation to the YA! Program. Thanks to a generous donation from the Land O’ Lakes Amigos group, all donations will be matched up to $5,000! Learn more here.

Posted in CLUES Blog by Austin Wiebe
December 3, 2018

Proposed Changes to Public Charge Policies Are a Threat to Immigrant and Latino Families

A message from Ruby Lee, President and CEO of Comunidades Latinas Unidas En Servicio (CLUES)

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We raise our voice against the administration’s proposed expansion of the public charge rule, which represents the most radical change to our nation’s immigration policy in decades. If this rule were to go into effect, upwards of 24 million people – including 9 million children – could be negatively impacted. The proposed policies would expand what counts against visa and green-card applicants – to include health, nutrition and housing benefits – and impose new income tests on working-class families. This rule raises many concerns. Perhaps most seriously, it is a direct threat to the health and wellbeing of immigrants and communities of color that will inevitably result in a sicker, hungrier and poorer nation.

This proposed overhaul takes aim at our family-based legal immigration system. Without a doubt, the changes are an attempt to force eligible individuals to choose between critical health and nutrition programs they might intermittently rely on and obtaining legal permanent resident status. The administration’s proposed changes would deem immigrants potentially unacceptable if they have received, or are considered likely to receive, even a modest amount of support from any number of non-cash supports including: Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), housing supports (including Section 8 vouchers) and subsidies for Medicare Part D to reduce the cost of prescription drugs.

The proposed regulation is divisive. It vilifies immigrant communities – primarily those of color – and reinforces false, negative stereotypes about who uses public benefits while unequivocally favoring wealthy immigrants. If this regulation moves forward, only those with means will be deemed worthy of entry to the United States, while working class immigrants, young adults, the disabled, sick and elderly and non-English dominant speakers would be categorically left out. The changes would, for the first time in our nation’s history, make a specific income threshold a central issue in immigration decisions. Having an income of under $15,000 for a single person or $31,000 for a family of four would be weighed negatively and could lead to a denial.

Chilling Effects

This proposed regulation has already sparked fear and panic among low-income immigrant communities. The uncertainty whether using public benefits would negatively affect an individual’s visa or green-card eligibility is prompting many to withdraw from social safety net programs for which they are eligible and pay taxes. Unfortunately, U.S. citizen children living in mixed-status households will disproportionately pay the price.

The proposed rule threatens our collective prosperity and makes it more difficult for U.S. citizens to reunite with family members abroad if those family members have low incomes. The loss of health coverage and access to healthy, nutritious foods will undoubtedly lead to increased hunger and negative health outcomes. Without housing assistance (also on the proposed rule expansive list), more families could be left homeless.

Our Children Will Bear the Burden, as Will the Country

A growing body of research shows that immigrants – many of them Latinos – help the U.S. economy through their labor, purchasing power, innovation and the billions of dollars they pay in federal taxes. But it is their children, second-generation Americans, who will contribute most to our country—but only if we invest in their health, education and overall wellbeing.

By 2050, an estimated one in three children in the U.S. will be Latino, and so will one in three members of the American workforce. In Minnesota, 45% of all Latinos are under the age of 20.  Given these projections, logic and economic self-preservation should spur us to treat these children—our children (and their hard-working parents)—better, since their fate and that of the nation are intertwined. By depriving a new generation of workers and taxpayers of adequate education, food, health care and shelter and deliberately stunting their prospects, we are ultimately hurting ourselves. 

Ruby Lee, CLUES President and CEO

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The government is required to read, count, review and consider all public feedback before issuing a final rule. We invite you to submit a comment on the proposed Public Charge rule changes at http://protectingimmigrantfamilies.org before Dec. 10, 2018.

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CLUES is Minnesota’s largest Latino-led organization. Founded in 1981, the organization’s mission is to advance the capacity of Latino individuals and families to be healthy, prosperous and engaged in their communities. CLUES leverages access to opportunity for Latinos and immigrants and stands for dismantling persistent and pervasive racial, economic, wellness and educational barriers that impede pathways to equality.

Posted in CLUES Blog by Austin Wiebe
October 2, 2018

It was an exciting day today as the old building next door to CLUES’ St. Paul Headquarters was demolished to make room for our new expansion! We are excited to create more space for community to come together and access resources and education as part of the growing Latino Cultural Corridor on St. Paul’s East side. Our expanded headquarters are scheduled to open in Spring 2019!

 

 

 

Posted in CLUES Blog by Austin Wiebe
September 29, 2018

*español abajo*

Beginning October 1, CLUES’ St. Paul Headquarters site will be under construction as our new expansion is built. Our offices and the Consulate of Mexico will remain open during this time. Please see the attached map and information below for parking and entrance information. We look forward to sharing our new expansion with you in Spring 2019!

During construction, CLUES’ main entrance will be located on Margaret Street. This is the only entrance through which clients and visitors may enter CLUES’ space.

The entrance to the Consulate of Mexico has been shifted slightly to face 7th Street. The door at the northwest corner of CLUES’ building will be a staff entrance and emergency exit only.

Throughout the construction, parking will be limited in the CLUES Parking Lot. To reach the entrance from this lot, follow the marked paths around the construction zone. Do not attempt to pass through the construction zone.

Additional parking is available on Margaret and surrounding streets and in the St. John Lutheran Church Lot. This lot is accessible via Margaret and Beech Streets as shown in the map below. Park only in spots labeled CLUES. To reach CLUES from this lot, exit the lot to the south toward Margaret Street, then continue down Margaret until you reach CLUES Entrance.

CLUES’ expanded headquarters are expected to open in Spring 2019. Please continue to monitor CLUES’ website and follow us on Facebook and Twitter for updates as construction progresses. Should you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us at info@clues.org or 651-379-4200.

Download Construction Flier


A partir del 1 de octubre, el sitio de la sede de CLUES en St. Paul estará en construcción debido a nuestra nueva expansión. Durante este tiempo, la entrada principal de CLUES se ubicará en Margaret Street. Esta es la única entrada a través de la cual los clientes podrán ingresar al espacio de CLUES.

La entrada al Consulado de México se ha cambiado para ubicarse en 7th Street. La puerta en la esquina noroeste del edificio de CLUES será solamente una entrada para el personal de CLUES y una salida de emergencia.

Durante la construcción, el estacionamiento será limitado en el Lote de CLUES. Siga los senderos marcados para llegar a la entrada de CLUES desde este lote. No intente atravesar la zona de construcción. 

Estacionamiento limitado adicional estará disponible en Margaret y otras calles cercanas y en el Lote de la Iglesia Luterana St. John. Este lote es accesible a través de las calles Margaret y Beech. Estaciónese sólo en lugares etiquetados para CLUES. Para llegar a la entrada de CLUES desde este lote, salga al sur hacia la calle Margaret, y siga por Margaret hasta que llegue a la entrada.

La expansión de CLUES se inaugurará en la primavera de 2019. Visite el sitio web de CLUES y síganos en Facebook y Twitter para recibir actualizaciones durante la construcción. Si tiene alguna pregunta, no dude en contactarnos al 651-379-4200 o info@clues.org.

Descargue volante sobre la construcción

Posted in CLUES Blog by Austin Wiebe
August 2, 2018

On Wednesday, Aug. 1, CLUES broke ground on an expansion to double the size of its Headquarters building on the East Side of Saint Paul.

CLUES President Ruby Lee led a ceremony announcing the launch of construction on the 19,000 sq. ft. expansion, which together with the current Headquarters will become an iconic Latino Cultural Hub and Community Center helping to expand and serve as a cornerstone of the growing Latino Cultural Corridor already underway on Seventh Street. St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter III and Senator Foung Hawj shared their well wishes for the project and emphasized the important role CLUES plays as a community leader and institution not only for the Latino community, but for St. Paul and Minnesota as a whole.

Also joining the celebration were Hon. Consul of Mexico Gerardo Guerrero; Senator Melisa Franzen; representatives from CLUES Board of Directors, BWBR Architects, ICS Consulting Inc. and RJM Construction; and other sponsors, community leaders and supporters.

“This is an exciting day for our organization and our community,” said Ruby Lee, CLUES President. “We are proud to be a destination point for the East Side of Saint Paul. Our vibrant Latino culture is an asset that will help expand investment and entrepreneurship on the lower East Side of Saint Paul. Our expansion will result into 39,000 sq. ft. of space where individuals and families of all ages and from all walks of life can build relationships, access resources and build community, all under one roof.”

As Minnesota’s largest Latino-led nonprofit agency, CLUES is positioned to serve Minnesota’s growing Latino population, which is expected to reach half a million by 2035 – more than 8.5 percent of the state’s total population. Today, CLUES and the Mexican Consulate (housed at CLUES Headquarters) bring more than 35,000 people to the neighborhood, helping to expand economic and business development in the neighborhood.

The expansion will include a new home for CLUES’ Elder Day Program, which currently occupies a leased space in St. Paul’s West Side, as well as other exciting new features including:

  • A Teen Tech Center facilitating learning in coding, music recording and film production
  • A Commercial Teaching Kitchen promoting healthy eating and microbusiness development
  • Six New Classrooms for workforce skills/career trainings ESL, GED, citizenship and computer classes
  • Flexible Meeting Space with a capacity of 140 for client and community gatherings

Construction will begin in late August 2018 and a grand opening is expected to take place in May 2019.

The $7.5 million Capital Expansion has been supported by the City of Saint Paul Neighborhood STAR grant and a variety of generous corporate and private donors, including 3M Foundation, Hugh J. Andersen Foundation, Katherine B. Andersen Fund, Best Buy Foundation, F.R. Bigelow Foundation, Otto Bremer Foundation, Butler Family Foundation, Chiasson Family Foundation, Hardenbergh Foundation, Mardag Foundation, Securian Foundation, St. Paul Foundation, Super Bowl 52 Host Committee Legacy Fund, Target Foundation, Travelers Foundation, Wells Fargo, MN Leadership Council, LISC (Local Initiatives Support Corporation) and generous individual donors.

CLUES thanks all the generous sponsors and supporters of our expansion. We look forward to celebrating with you at our grand opening in 2019!


CLUES was founded in 1981 by and for Latinos to provide culturally and linguistically relevant
services. CLUES mission is to advance the capacity of Latino individuals and families to be healthy, prosperous and engaged in their communities. In addition to its Headquarters in St. Paul, CLUES has offices in Minneapolis, Willmar and Austin, MN. For more information, please visit www.clues.org or follow CLUES on Facebook and Twitter.

Posted in CLUES Blog by CLUES Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio
June 22, 2018

CLUES staff and clients were honored to be part of a new mural dedicated June 18 at Minneapolis City Hall. The mural, titled “El Camino del Corazón” (The Journey of the Heart), was created through a partnership with GoodSpace Murals and ReCAST Minneapolis (Resilience in Communities After Stress & Trauma).

Several CLUES clients and staff members from Guatemala, Ecuador, Mexico and Colombia met weekly with GoodSpace artists Greta McLain and Candida Gonzalez to share their stories as immigrants and refugees in the United States. Together, the group created the theme and artwork for the mural, which they later painted alongside staff from the City of Minneapolis.

CLUES President Ruby Lee and Associate Director of Community Health Carla Kohler spoke at the dedication Monday alongside Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and other representatives from the City of Minneapolis and GoodSpace Murals.

The project has been a wonderful way for our community to share their stories and experience and to talk with city officials on how to better engage with immigrant and refugee communities.

The mural is open to the public and on display on the third floor of Minneapolis City Hall outside the City Council chambers.

Posted in CLUES Blog by CLUES Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio
May 31, 2018

UPDATE: Temporary Program Locations Below

Dear CLUES Clients and Community:

Due to damages sustained to our building at 720 East Lake St. in Minneapolis, CLUES services will be temporarily relocated while the building is repaired. We anticipate returning to our Minneapolis office no later than September 2018.

Programs and services will be temporarily provided at the locations below, and most services are also available at our St. Paul office located at 797 East 7th St. in St. Paul. Please contact us at 651-379-4217 with any questions.


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND COMMUNITY HEALTH

Mental and chemical health counseling, health insurance navigation and related services will be temporarily provided at:

Midtown Doctors Building
2545 Chicago Ave. S. (Three blocks from CLUES)
Suite 515/517 (5th floor)


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Evening ESL classes (6-8:30 pm), SNAP and benefits support, job search, employment navigation, and related services will be temporarily provided at:

Minnesota Workforce Center
777 E. Lake St. (Across the street from CLUES)

Daytime ESL and GED classes (10 am-12:30 pm) will be temporarily provided at:
Mt. Olive Lutheran Church
3045 Chicago Ave. S. (Two blocks from CLUES)


FINANCIAL EMPOWERMENT

Financial coaching, homebuyer counseling, lending circles, asset building and related service will be temporarily provided at:

Fairview Clinic
1527 East Lake St.  (Nine blocks from CLUES)
Suite #200A (2nd floor)


FAMILY SERVICES

Domestic violence and sexual assault support and parenting education continue to be available at CLUES satellite office located at:

Minnesota Workforce Center
777 East Lake St. (Across the street from CLUES)

Thank you for your patience and understanding as we navigate this unfortunate situation. We will continue to post updates on CLUES website at www.clues.org as well as our Facebook and Twitter pages. Please contact us at 651-379-4217 with any questions.



IMPORTANT NOTICE

On Sunday night, May 27, a devastating fire destroyed the building next door to our Minneapolis office. Unfortunately, the subsequent demolition of the building caused significant structural damage to the CLUES building. Because the safety of our staff and clients is our number one concern, we decided to close the building until it’s completely repaired.

During this transition, several CLUES staff and services will be moved to our St. Paul office (797 East 7th Street, St. Paul), where we will welcome Minneapolis clients and patients. We will assist them with transportation needs if necessary. Individual programs will be relocated to temporary locations during the transition.
We ask others to call 651-379-4217 for more information or to schedule individual appointments. You may visit our website to get direct contact information for specific programs.
We appreciate your patience and understanding as we work through this unfortunate situation.
We send our thoughts and offer support to all residents and business owners who were directly impacted by this fire. We also send our thanks to the Minneapolis Fire and Police Departments for their prompt response and service. Our thanks to many friends, elected officials and supporters who promptly offered their aid and support.
Ruby Lee, President
And the entire CLUES Team
Posted in CLUES Blog by CLUES Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio